queeniman:

fileformat:

coreydrake:

Girl Maces Dude For Being Rude (by RuthlessTelevison)

I love it

I’M SCREAMING

SIGNED 

SEALED

DELIVERED 

(via cuntofdoom)

thesexqueen:

tiger03lily:

wrapyourlipsaroundmyname:

badgalfaashion:

brainy-beauty:

inmytwistedfairytale:

HE HANDED THAT SHIT TO HIMMMMM

Farrakhan does not fear man. Amen.

DANM!!

I think this make the 10th time ive reblogged this 

amazing

How to passionately respond to American ethnocentrism. This guy has some amazing points, and if you find the need to argue him, I’d recommend investigating ethnocentrism, and aversive racism.

(via stfumras)

michiko-malandro:

exquisiteblackpeople:

Please take a moment of your day to help this family get a amber alert going for these two little ones. If you see them call police or crime stoppers at 1-800-speakup.
Click here

this is serious, they were in custody of their mother and she was found deceased

michiko-malandro:

exquisiteblackpeople:

Please take a moment of your day to help this family get a amber alert going for these two little ones. If you see them call police or crime stoppers at 1-800-speakup.

Click here

this is serious, they were in custody of their mother and she was found deceased

(via my-little-underground)

dollyfarton:

reminder to all

(via my-little-underground)

huffingtonpost:

STYLIST WHO SPENDS EVERY SUNDAY CUTTING HAIR FOR HOMELESS: ‘EVERY HUMAN LIFE IS WORTH THE SAME’

Mark Bustos is a hair stylist at an upscale salon in New York City, but not all of his clientele have to be wealthy to get a quality trim. Sometimes, they don’t need a penny.

For more photos of Busto’s work and more about his inspirational story go here. 

(via my-little-underground)

kropotkindersurprise:

Two ways of dealing with tear gas grenades from comrades in Turkey: Either submerge them in water. Make sure you can close off the container cause the gas will still spread for a while. Or throw them in the fire so the gas burns off before it can spread.

(via johnnytremendous)

danismm:

FLITZ

danismm:

FLITZ

unconsumption:

How Do You Feel About Being Turned Into Compost When You Die? | Co.Exist | ideas impact:

Even when we’re dead, most Americans keep adding to our carbon footprints. Can the rituals around death be redesigned to become more sustainable?
With her Urban Death Project, designer Katrina Spade has been working on a greener alternative for the last three years. Along with the environmental issues, the design also considers the problem of space—cemeteries in the U.S. take up about a million acres of land, and as populations grow, even more space is needed. Spade wanted to find an answer that would allow people to be buried in cities.
The design uses composting to turn bodies into soil-building material for nearby farms and community gardens, so people literally become part of the city they once lived in. A four-story building, which Spade envisions being built in neighborhoods across a city, would serve both as composter and a place for ritual, where family members could see the deceased person for the last time. The composting process would take about two years.

More here.

unconsumption:

How Do You Feel About Being Turned Into Compost When You Die? | Co.Exist | ideas impact:

Even when we’re dead, most Americans keep adding to our carbon footprints. Can the rituals around death be redesigned to become more sustainable?

With her Urban Death Project, designer Katrina Spade has been working on a greener alternative for the last three years. Along with the environmental issues, the design also considers the problem of space—cemeteries in the U.S. take up about a million acres of land, and as populations grow, even more space is needed. Spade wanted to find an answer that would allow people to be buried in cities.

The design uses composting to turn bodies into soil-building material for nearby farms and community gardens, so people literally become part of the city they once lived in. A four-story building, which Spade envisions being built in neighborhoods across a city, would serve both as composter and a place for ritual, where family members could see the deceased person for the last time. The composting process would take about two years.

More here.

deltaqoodrem:

Michelle Rodriguez laying down truths
[x]

(via stfumras)